Never assume you’ve seen the best of the Philippines: Visit Siargao if you haven’t, my latest dream paradise!

By Diana Marie Laguardia-Paquingan

Maddie goes island-hopping! Siargao is one of the best places you can introduce your precociously cute toddlers to the beauty of nature. Just one headache, they will not leave.

Siargao Island, Philippines – I long wanted to visit this rising island paradise but the over 12 hours of travel from Davao City with a baby in tow kept me from going. As soon as Philippine Airlines announced its direct flight from Davao City to Siargao earlier this year, I grabbed the opportunity and booked us a flight instantly.

“Siargao is a tear-drop shaped island in the Philippine Sea situated 800 kilometers southeast of Manila in the province of Surigao del Norte. It has a land area of approximately 437 square kilometres.” – Wikipedia

I never had a difficult time planning our itinerary since I already asked few friends who have been there. There are also many blogs about Siargao available in the internet. Once just a haven for surfers, it is fast emerging as a premier tourist destination. It even has a its own box-office hit movie.

A few friendly tips and reminders before heading out to the island:

A perfect break for a working mom. It is hard to get over Siargao’s serene loveliness.

A family trip and a time alone, throw in an amazing atmosphere like this, are among the best times of life.

Of course, the no brainer, bring cash. Wads if you can, and help boost the local economy. I mean, your credit cards might be at rest for awhile.

Never rely on your bank cards – debit, savings or whatever. There is only one ATM in General Luna and sometimes goes offline. Most restaurants and shops do not accept credit/debit which is quite a problem for travellers.

“Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” – Helen Keller

Bring a family member you can share the fun and responsibility. This is my top advice for a family vacation with kids, tag along your sister or brother for an extra hand in baby sitting and in — taking photos. 🙂

Bonding time with a perfect backdrop. It is hard to find fault in Siargao. You’ll love every bit of it.

Bring sunscreen. Lots of them. Too much sun is too challenging to handle. It can also be expensive from the local shops.

Book your accommodation ahead. In my case, I booked our accommodation five months earlier because hotels and bed-n-breakfasts easily sell out. Don’t just walk in and expect to find an accommodation that’s exactly what you wanted for a holiday – and the budget that you have.

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in you sail. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain

My husband Sherman takes his quiet time. Must be tough balancing two sea urchins in his life now.

Take care of the environment. Limit the use of plastic cups and straws and be mindful of your trash. Do not litter. Throw them in proper garbage boxes. It was a relief that a lot of groups are trying to keep the island protected. When you go visit, help maintain instead of becoming a problem.

“Take only memories, leave only footprints.” – Chief Seattle

No to plastic straws! Siargao ingenuously uses this environment-friendly coconut straw for your drinking needs.

We feel fortunate to spend a lot of fun times with our 2-year old daughter Maddie while she still have a lot of time for us.

Our itinerary

Day 1: Arrival and quick tour around General Luna and Cloud 9. General Luna is mostly where the shops and restaurants are located. Entrance fee to Cloud 9 is P50/head (USD1).

Our Maddie is now a certified sea urchin.

Traveling with a toddler: Tips here

Cloud 9 lives up to its name.

Day 2: Magpupungko Rock and tidal pool +Sugba Lagoon. We rented a jeepney for P2500 (USD50) to take us to these spots, which is more comfortable than a tricyle and less expensive than a van that roughly costs P4000/day (USD80). It costs P1200/head (USD24) for a small boat to take you to the lagoon.

Siargao’s colorful jeepneys, a classic Philippine ride, is a comfortable alternative for a tour.

Pristine waters – we are blessed not to travel far to enjoy this!

Planning for a trip in Taiwan with a baby in tow? Here’s what you can do.

Having a toddler in an island trip is double the fun. Maddie is used to traveling before she turned one-year old she is now a wanderlust.

“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.” – Anthony Bourdain

Day 3: Island Hopping day. I booked a reliable island hopping tour guide, My Siargao Guide (check them out in Facebook) and paid around P1000/head (USD20) to take us into 3 island, Guyam, Naked and Daku Islands.

Siargao is peace. Picture perfect scenery combined with quiet and calm.

Our little one’s tiny legs never got tired exploring the island.

Day 4: Horseback riding and beach bumming. My cousin Tina LaGuardia-Sarraga’s family runs Magic Rides, a fun horseback riding service along the shores of Siargao. Click on the link and make a reservation. It was an amazing first-time experience for Maddie!

“Because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain.” – Jack Kerouac

Horseback by the sea! Maddie took her first pony ride with beautiful cousin Simone courtesy of Magic Rides.

Where to eat? La Carinderia, Harana, Bravo Surf resort, Kermit (best pizza in the island), Shaka, The Dirty Kitchen

“Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures.” – Lovelle Drachman

You are in for a pizza treat in Kermit. Don’t miss it!

Traveling also made Maddie easy to adjust to weather and different conditions.

The Author

Diane is Admissions Officer at Tebow-Cure Hospital in Davao City, Philippines. She also operates a 2-bedroom AirBnB place right at the heart of the city.

Getting around Berlin: Brace yourself for the walking frenzy!

The enchanting garden at Pergamon Museum and National Gallery.

It was autumn cold. The leaves were yellow and falling. How travel giddy can you get, you get that at autumn.

The excitement was on high pitch. Yes, Berlin!

Germany’s capital is home to the Berlin Wall that fell down on 1989, the Reichstag, the Holocaust Memorial, the Berlin Dom, Checkpoint Charlie, the Pergamon Museum and well, Homeland’s Season 5. You can think of an emoticon for the last one but I won’t budge as a forever fan.

Taking a train and arriving in a hauptbahnhof (train station) in Germany is an experience in itself. It opened on May 2006 and transports at least 300,000 passengers per day. I have been to the stations (which are conveniently shortened to HBFs) in Cologne, Frankfurt (and the one at the airport), Freiburg, Heidelberg, Karlsruhe, Mannheim and Munich. The lucky 8th is Berlin.

This city has too much history in just one place. Exploring it for 5 days isn’t enough. Well, holidays aren’t always enough, are they?

The climb at the Reichstag was dizzying but amazing especially at sunset.

Some of these tips you already know but it helps to be reminded one more time before you pack and go:

  • Choose a place close to a train station. All the walking is punishing. By the time I got home at night, even if I did few coffee shop breaks, I can’t hardly lift my legs. The apartment in Charlottenburg was perfect. The place was also teeming with Asian restaurants I felt at home. It was at least 5 stations away by train but all the stations have their own must-visit spots (such as Bellevue that gets my vote for the nicest train station).

 When you leave Berlin in a train for the next city, be early in your designated gleis (railway track). The trains stop quite quickly for few minutes and closes the door on time. You’ll have to wait for the next and if your ticket schedule is non-transferrable to the next train, then you’ll have to get another one.

  • Bring your most comfortable shoes. I wish you luck! I brought two – a pair of street boots and one rubber shoes that I have alternately used. The shoes worked but my legs failed me. By day 5 my knees hurt I can hardly climb stairs, I began to be grateful whoever invented escalators and elevators that are available in most of the train and tram stations. Their escalators go both ways so it can take you down after they have taken people up.

  • Wherever you come from and it’s your first time, go straight to the Information Centre right in front of the station. You cannot miss it. If you cannot speak in German then they’ll orient you properly. There’s also the Tourism Centre where you can get a week’s ticket that already covers train, tram and bus rides inside the city. You can also get your ticket for hop-on hop-off tour buses if you’re interested.

The Berlin Dom is a basilica popularly known as the Protestant St Peter’s dating from 1905.

  • Check for a free walking tour. There’s always one wherever you go. It’s a nice way to start the holiday. Sometimes you also get to help a group of students or volunteers who get by with the tips. I’ve always done this in countless cities I’ve been to from Africa to Europe. In Berlin, I once again found Sandeman’s Free Walking Tour and it was great I signed up for their other paid tours. Check them out as they are in 17 cities in Europe and in New York in the US.
  • Do your homework before the trip. Nowadays it is easier to plan ahead with a lot of travel sites and Google helping you where the famous sites are located. Doing your top 6-10 list will help you shorten your travel time. Getting lost is not an awful thing in Berlin as wherever you end is always something unexpectedly fantastic. But that’s if you have enough time to lose. When I got lost finding a nice restaurant, I ended up finding that incredible Bellevue Train Station. Don’t forget the list plus the addresses. See mine below.
    • Brandenburg Gate
    • The Reichstag
    • The Berlin Wall Memorial
    • The Charlottenburg Palace
    • Berlin Cathedral
    • Holocaust Memorial
    • Museum Island
    • The Sunday Flea Market at the Mauer Park
    • Checkpoint Charlie
    • The Tiergarten

The Berlin Wall was was a sobering experience. It’s a stark reminder that evil exists but will never prevail with humanity’s goodness.

Our trip to the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp was a sobering experience. Political prisoners were kept as slave labourers from 1936 to 1945. It was there that the first crematory was built in 1940. Our tour guide Rob from Sandeman’s facilitated an interesting discussion of the camp, its history and the turbulence brought by the Nazi empire.

One more thing, if you’re staying at hotels, don’t leave your rooms a mess. I realised many of the rooms are cleaned up by hardworking immigrants and friendly locals. You’ll make their lives easier by keeping your room clean and tidy. Our holidays do not have to be a burden to others.

I’d say, Berlin is a city on history-overload. But I also like the eclectic openness, the warmth of people and its ongoing quest to have its own place among the world’s famous cities, trying to be ahead but not yet there. Not quite but watch out London and New York.

You do not need another word to convince me to go back. I left my heart in Berlin.

If you have enough time, plan for a relaxing tour where you do not hurry and cram the day so you see everything. The truth is, you will never see all of them unless you live there for a year. Enjoy and savor each moment. Don’t get too caught up with photo opportunities that you end up visiting the place but not really enjoying it. I appreciated Berlin because I’ve read it in so many history books. It felt like I was visiting a place I knew for a long time. Read about the place before you go. Every trip is a chance to educate yourself more about our beautiful world.

Inside the Reichstag. Orderly, fascinating and a walk through German Empire’s power hall. It opened in 1894 and got burned down in 1933. Schedule your visit on weekdays at around 5pm to avoid too much crowd. You can get the ticket in a booth near the building across the street and it’s free!

The Berlin Hauptbahnhof (Central Train Station) is a hub for travelers complete with a wide array of shopping and eating choices.

The entrance and main watchtower of the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp. Thousands of inmates line up for morning and afternoon rolls cals in its wide space below. At the iron gate the infamous slogan “arbeit macht frei (work makes you free)” is embedded in wrought iron.

-o00o-

Next week: Let’s go to Munich’s Oktoberfest!